Jobo Designs

Letting the crafty creative juices flow. Knitting, spinning, crafting, dyeing, rabbits, sheep and more!

8. August 2012 08:20
by Jobo
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False Start.

8. August 2012 08:20 by Jobo | 0 Comments

I've been working ahead on some gift socks for my holiday knitting. but unfortunately it's a false start.

 

First the Yarn:  Some of my old standby, KnitPicks Stroll Tonal in Canopy

 

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the RoadI purchased a copy of "The Road Goes Ever On"  by Claire Ellen some time ago. and decided that now was the time to get started and get my Cable-On.  This collection of socks (mostly cabled, some lace) is beautifully designed and contains great charts and detailed patterns.  Each design is named for a character from the Lord of the Rings series by Tolkien too. so neat back stories as well.

 

My only real complaint is that there aren't more photos of these fantastic socks.  I've been going back and forth to Ravelry to look at projects to get more ideas of how the designs wrap around the heels and legs, since many of them are quite unique.

 

I decided to start with Eomer. a very cabled pair, featuring some 2-stitch travelling cables that remind me of wrought iron gates, and some sections of double moss stitch and rib.

 

I love everything about this sock really.. the only thing I didn't account for though is the fact that I started with the "small" size, and the way that the cables run has really restricted the stretch of the ankle and leg of the sock.  But look at them!  So pretty and curving, almost like a filigree of green yarny goodness. and I was almost enjoying the double-moss.  Why is it that I can't stand K1P1 Ribbing, and would rather poke my own eyes out with a set of 2.5mms, but I actually like double moss?  Its the same darn thing!  Clearly it's in my head.  go figure.

 

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tip cables pull inSo bummer: I'm in the frog pond. I just wish I hadn't made it all the way to the heel before trying to put it on my foot. My ankles were ginormous last summer from the fluid accumulation of pregnancy, and they have shrunk back to a normalish size (I can wear my own shoes and socks again finally) but I don't think that there's even a remote chance that these will go comfortably around my ankle, let alone take the chance that they might not go over the intended gift recipient's ankle either.  The heel is so pretty too. the way the cables spread out over the top of the ankle, then turn into ribbing.  I bet it would have hugged the ankle perfectly too Smile

 

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Oh well. it's been ravelled and I'm back to the drawing board. I'm thinking maybe I'll try a Cookie A. design I've been sitting on for a while and come back to the Cabled-wonders some other time.  It's a little heartbreaking to rip back cables so lovely!

6. August 2012 09:28
by Jobo
1 Comments

Red Red Socks. A Grandma Story

6. August 2012 09:28 by Jobo | 1 Comments

My nearly 80 year old grandmother has been saying for years that she's too old/tired/etc to knit anymore.  She can't see very well, requires hearing aids, and generally doesn't feel all that well most of the time.  every project she completes, she comments that she thinks it will be the last doily/embroidered pillowcase/socks that she makes.

 

Well my Mother and I have been pulling the wool over her eyes for a while now. she runs out of yarn - and we buy some more.  She comments again that it's too much work. and I drop by with a newly finished project and some skeins of wool to be wound into balls.  She has something almost finished (aka. just the last toe on a pair of socks left) and my Mom will drop off some extra pretty yarn in just the right color.  Invariably, a few days later she will have cast on another project, and will keep on picking away at it Smile  She just needs a little encouragement along the way.

 

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One such knit-trickery scheme involved my Mom bringing Grandma some bright red (Grandma's favorite color) tonal-style yarn over one day.  In the past, Grandma always knit the same pair of cabled rib socks (a-la-old-patons-beehive-leaflet) for my Grampa over and over again.  They were always blue or grey or brown.  Manly colors.  Always in Kroy or old-school wool.  This red yarn was the exact opposite of the usual cool boring muted tones - it was soft, squishy, warm rosy reds and plums.

 

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Grandma wasn`t too sure anyone would wear socks made from such a bright color.  I assured her that I wear socks of every color. the brighter the better in fact.  I see them like a beacon of happy color, hidden in shoes during the day, but peeking out over the tops like a not-so-well-kept secret.  She agreed that if I would wear the socks. she would like to try knitting with that yarn.  So that was that.

 

Now the socks are done!  What do you think?  I think they look charming and cheery in red!  And there is just enough yarn left for a little pair for the littlest beetle too. My plan is to knit up a pair that will fit the Rome-ster and we can wear our matching set when we visit Grams again.  I bet that will keep her inspired for a little while longer?

 

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3. August 2012 09:11
by Jobo
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Lilac Leaves. first crack at a traditionally constructed Haapsalu Shawl

3. August 2012 09:11 by Jobo | 0 Comments

I've been admiring these things for soooo long now, it's a little hard to believe its the first time I've managed to actually do one!  I've done some samplers, and several Estonian-style lace shawls. but this time I used the schematics from "The Haapsalu Shawl" book and decided to try the traditional way with a simple border and center motif.

 

lilac leaves with border

 

The basic idea is this:  Knit a rectangle with a garter stitch border.  Knit a border separately and seam it onto the rectangle in a manner that it stretches and melds in with the center.  After blocking, you can't tell it's sewn on at all.  In fact, I like the way it looks like the corners have been rounded a bit.

 

I decided to go with a very simple pairing for the first try. some lilac leaves for the central panel, and a basic garter lace edge.  I love the simplicity of this style of lace leaf.  It's a repeating pattern of 16 rows.   The reverse rows are all purl, the yarnovers stack in a perfectly tidy "spine" for the leaves, and the decreases form a simple point to the leaves.  I didn't have to think too hard, but still managed to create something quite elegant.

 

lilac leaves sewn on border

 

For a first time really sewing on a border, I think it turned out pretty well.  One mistake I made though. cutting the thread between the two long border sections.  All that meant was that I had 4 more stupid ends to weave in.  Also - I think I would be a little better at weaving in the ends next time.  The silk in the thread made things a little more slippery than I am used to, and meant a little more weaving and fiddling than plain wool would have been.

 

I was interested to learn that the edging is knit in garter lace (all wrong side rows are "knitted" instead of "purled") so that the points don't roll after blocking and unpinning.  The central panels of often very complicated lace are almost all stockinette lace (purling the wrong side rows) but the edgings are planned in a really smart way.  Somebody was thinking when they decided on that one. it's true - after blocking, even after folding and refolding, and toting it around for a week or two, no rolling.

 

More about the yarn. in case you were wondering:  It's KnitPicks Gloss lace in "Bare".  I really like the simplicity of this yarn.  70% Merino wool with 30% silk.  Nice and light (50g is about 440 yards) and the silk adds just that hint of shine.  I used about 75 g in total. basically using up the leftovers from some other project I had been puttering with.  I think next time I'd like to go for the full sized shawl though.  This one was around 18 inches wide by 50 inches long. the real deal Haapsalu should be more like 30 inches wide by 75 inches long.  I was running out of yarn, so maybe it's best I just stuck with the conservative approach.  I suppose not all things (quilts, shawls, blankets, etc) must be ginormously huge.  Try telling my brain that though.  "Go big or go home" is it's motto some days.

 

lilac leaves thru a ring

 

Seeing as how this shawl is using a little larger yarn than called for (a true Haapsalu uses finer 100% wool thread) and the dimensions aren't quite large enough. maybe it's not surprising that the shawl will slip through my wedding ring?  And No, I don't have super large hands or anything.  I'll be interested to see if the next one will go through it. I'm working on a Lily of the Valley one next, and it has lots of Nupps (Estonian bobble stitches of a fashion) which may add some bulk to the design.  Only time will tell  : )

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