Jobo Designs

Letting the crafty creative juices flow. Knitting, spinning, crafting, dyeing, rabbits, sheep and more!

4. July 2011 10:57
by Jobo
0 Comments

Yarn Candy Monday... More Lace Handspun

4. July 2011 10:57 by Jobo | 0 Comments

madli Swatch

Lately I've been gravitating towards ultra-thin, almost cobwebby handspun for lace.  I think maybe because I like getting the absolute most out of a pretty braid of fiber... that, and I love to knit lace in the first place! 

This - is from a bag of carded fiber from Belfast Mini Mills - a blend of Bamboo, Merino and Tussah Silk (percentages of which elude me at the moment)  I'm testing out a theory that I should be able to spin this very lightweight on my Russian Supported Spindle, and perhaps have enough out of the 4 ounce bag to make an estonian style haapsalu shawl... or at least something in that tradition.  I wanted to spin up a handful first and see how the finished yarn behaves before I go on to complete the whole bag.

The Yarn is a nice fine 2 ply... which shifts from light creamy green to denim blue and back and forth.  Basically the roving has a strip of each color side-by-side (will get more photos later) and as you spin back and forth across you get a blend.  When I started spinning, I noticed quite a few nepps and little blobs of the silk, which was a little disappointing.  I had hoped for an ultra-smooth spin, as one would usually find with bamboo and silk blend fibers.  I decided though, to just let it go - spin it as it comes - and try not to be too much of a control freak about everything.  I'm going to have to learn to let go a bit with the whole baby thing, so why not start now?  (Jobo - you can't control every aspect of the world... lol)madli thread swatch

I decided to try a swatch from Knitted Lace of Estonia, since that's what was on my coffee table at the time... though I will likely go back to the Haapsalu Shawl Book when the yarn is completed and I'm ready for the official cast on.  I plan to do the basic rectangle, with the vine lace and nupps, and the standard garter stitch border, then maybe a knitted border sewn on afterwards, sanity and remaining yarn notwithstanding.  This swatch was knit on 2.75 mm dpns (since also, this is what was on my coffee table!)

The resulting lace yarn has some lumps and bumps in it.  The colors come at you randomly (only blended a little by the 2-ply's effect) and I wasn't sure if the lace stitches would cover up and complement some of this effect, or hide the lace completely.  I think the finished swatch is alright... definitely less muddy than I might have guessed it would be.  I think it's promising enough to finish spinning up the bag this way, and then cast on and see how it goes.

What do you think?  does the yarn mask the lace too much?

7. February 2011 12:05
by Jobo
0 Comments

Yarn Candy Monday: not yarny so much...

7. February 2011 12:05 by Jobo | 0 Comments

haapsalu_shawlIn the last little bit... there hasn't been a lot of new yarn coming into the house... a few things here and there, but no real beauty skeins just waiting to be showcased.  So today, instead, I thought I would show you a new book that arrived in the mail last week! The Haapsalu Shawl:  A knitted Lace Tradition from Estonia

Quite honestly, this book is crazy!  Crazy good of course, but still quite intimidating.  I have been in love with Estonian lace from the moment I first saw it... and when I hear this book had been translated into English, I really couldn't help myself.

This isn't so much a pattern book, as an anthology of the traditional lace motifs and borders used in the very beautiful Haapsalu Shawls and Scarves of Estonia.  There are more than 100 beautiful lace designs charted out... from lilies of the valley with their lovely nupps, to Greta Garbo patterns, leaves, vines, butterflies, and so many more.  I have read each article, and flipped through the lace sections a dozen times already.  The beauty of the fine lace just takes my breath away.

Also, in the beginning of this Estonian Lace "Bible", there is a section describing the traditional shawl and scarf makeup.  It shows dimensions, proper arrangement, sample stitch counts, seaming diagrams, blocking instructions, yarn suggestions... all the things a knitter needs to make a *real* authentic Haapsalu Shawl.  Perfect for a wannabe like me... so I can someday try this.

I have chosen a few lace styles that I really love... and am making lots of mental notes about the shawl I want to make someday.  I've started looking for commercially available yarn, but will likely end up spinning my own, perhaps from Merino, or Cashmere Blend or something.  A girl can dream... can't she?

Powered by BlogEngine.NET | Theme: Yoko by Elmastudio, adapted by onesoft

Top