Jobo Designs

Letting the crafty creative juices flow. Knitting, spinning, crafting, dyeing, rabbits, sheep and more!

25. January 2010 11:00
by Jobo
0 Comments

Yarn Candy Monday: <insert Pink Panther Theme Song here>

25. January 2010 11:00 by Jobo | 0 Comments

Once this yarn came off the niddy noddy... there was no denying it... the color reminds me of the Pink Panther... though the squishy softness is heavenly onto itself!

Lately, I have been trying to spin some "larger" fatter yarns, as a challenge to myself.  I really like spinning thinner yarns for lace and socks, but wanted to learn the full range of spinning techniques.  So this particular 2 ply yarn is a basic barber pole from a mostly pink hand dyed roving (with some purplish bits) and worked out to be a Bulky yarn - somewhere around 7 WPI

pink panther

I'm not sure what I'll make with it, but the skein feels huge and puffy!  I was thinking I might make a baby item for a friend's new little bundle, but since the yarn isn't super wash, it might not be very practical for that kind of project.  (I usually make new baby things from acrylic since you can machine wash it, and the darn stuff is nearly indestructible!)

pinkpanther 2 

The lightness and poofyness of this yarn makes me think it should be used to create something that will be worn around the neck or close to the body... since I have been rubbing my face in it every time I walk by it... lol. 

(pick up yarn, squish, raise to face, inhale.  repeat until stress subsides.  if necessary carry yarn around to pet.  repeat initial recommendation)

5. April 2009 17:52
by Jobo
2 Comments

Captain Corriedale... Part 2 - Spun, Washed, Skeined!

5. April 2009 17:52 by Jobo | 2 Comments

So I finished my singles... plied and Voila!  

I think my extra twist paid off, because the resulting yarn plied quite nicely... giving more tightly wound yarn than I would normally get.  Which of course is exactly what you want with sock yarn in the first place.  Also, the long staples of the corriedale gave a nice smooth single, combined with the extra twist, resulting in a smooth strong strand.

The original roving had very distinct locations of colour, so I was surprised at how much the colours muddied here.  I suppose since it was 3-plied, the colours were able to spread out... giving longer gradations of shades, as opposed to discrete sections of colour.  I will remember this as I continue dying roving to spin... adjacent colours tend to mix into each other.  For example, Yellow next to blue gives some greenish tones.  Note to self, Purple next to Yellow gives brownish greenish mud. While the resulting muted tones aren't completely undesirable, I found the beige-ey light brownish areas kindof boring.  It would have been nice to keep the pretty purples and yellows distinct more.



Overall, very pleased with the way this yarn turned out.  Now I just need to finish a few of the current sock marathons so I can start a new one :) 

Either that... or I need to go and get another couple sets of DPNs... hmmm sounds tempting

21. March 2009 12:28
by Jobo
2 Comments

Captain Corriedale... and The Quest for Perfect Hand-Spun Sock Yarn

21. March 2009 12:28 by Jobo | 2 Comments

I have been sitting on a bunch of Superwash Corriedale handpainted rovings I bought about a year ago... when I was just starting to spin.  I have 2 braids of 4 oz each "Sun Ray", and a Navy blue Coordinating BFL roving of about 4 oz that I purchased from Squoosh.

I was afraid to use them at first... because of course as a new spinner, I didn't want to "Ruin" the good stuff during the learning process.  I know thats a silly view to have on things, but I know I'm not alone in that way of thinking.  I read a post on Ravelry the other day about someone else worried about ruining a perfectly good roving by not knowing what to do with it exactly.  Well, since I have been at this a year, I figured the time has come...

My  plan is to divide each yellow braid into sections and spin in long stretches of colour, then 3-ply it to make some superwash sock yarn.  My spinning has been getting better lately, more even and more consistent, so I am able to produce much more useable yarns.  I love knitting socks, so I think sock yarn was the natural choice here.

I hear that for spinning sock yarn, BFL and Corrie are considered to be good choices because: 

     * Longer wool staple

     *A little coarser fiber

I mean seriously, if you are going to all the trouble of spinning the wool, and then knitting socks with it, you want to make sure that the finished socks are at least somewhat durable in the end.  I'd be pretty sour if I got them done, wore them twice, and wore the heel out of them or something. This is a superwash fiber also, so less likely to felt or get ruined during the washing process.  I often worry that a homemade sock will accidentally make it into the dryer and get completely shrunken beyond recognition.

This fiber, though a little coarser than the Merino I have been using lately, is really really soft and squooshy (the supplier didn't lie on that one :P)  And the colours are mostly butter/lemon yellow hues with a few splashes of Blue and green (where the blue and yellow mix of course)  I'm not sure If I will use only the yellow braids, or mix in some of the plain blue braid, or maybe one of the 3 plies as completely blue. I haven't quite decided yet.  I might just spin up a bunch of the yellow first and see what it looks like.  Generally my plan changes on the fly... especially when it comes to spinning it seems.



From the reading I have done it seems that to make an ideal sock yarn, you also want to have: 

     * Worsted spinning (not Woolen)

     * tightly spun singles with lots of twist

     * multiple plies, because more plies yields more strength and durability

Naturally, since this preparation is "top" and all the fibers are already nicely aligned - worsted was a no brainer.  No fluffy airy yarns for these socks!

Also, as I am spinning this up I am trying to add a bit more twist than I usually would, to get a more solid single, and hopefully a more solid and practical yarn.  This is kind of funny to be working on, since all along I have been trying to put in less spin!  My first yarns were very much overspun and almost wiry, so I was trying to learn to lighten up the spin to achieve softer loftier yarns.  I guess it's true how we have to learn and unlearn our so called bad habits.  I have been trying so hard to spin smoother thinner singles, I probably couldn't spin a thick bumpy one if I tried.  Someday when I want to make novelty or thick and thin yarns, I will have to learn all over again to make those newbie errors that it took me so long to forget!

I chose 3-ply simply because I have done this before and it seems to work out okay for me.  I think if I were to try for 4-ply my singles are still a little too fat.  I think after more practice though I could handle this.  The last 3-ply sock yarn I did was nice, and I am having fun working on a mystery project with them (to be posted when finished and photographed).  I also decided against using a Navajo 3-ply after reading the opinions of several Ravellers who mentionned that Navajo doesn't seem to stand up to wear as well since the 3 plies are running back and forth up the shaft of the yarn, not all in the same direction like traditional 3-ply.  I have made socks with navajo plied yarn, and I didn't find any problems, but they are nowhere near being worn out yet... so who knows.  I have lots of time to work on this project, and could definetly use some practice with multiple ply yarns, so I will consider this a kind of experiment as I go.

More pics to come post-spinning :)

Powered by BlogEngine.NET | Theme: Yoko by Elmastudio, adapted by onesoft

Top