Jobo Designs

Letting the crafty creative juices flow. Knitting, spinning, crafting, dyeing, rabbits, sheep and more!

24. November 2014 22:36
by Jobo
0 Comments

Whats in the Bowl? How to Choose a Spindle Bowl

24. November 2014 22:36 by Jobo | 0 Comments

A friend recently asked me what kind of spinning bowl I like to use... I guess I have a bit of a loaded answer?

It depends on:

- the material the spindle is made of... and the material the bowl is made of

- the shape of the spindle

- how fast I want the spindle to turn

- what position I want to sit in while I spindle

 20141125_111214

Top:  Pyrex finger bowl / Malcolm Fielding Dervish;  Bottom Left:  Glazed Pottery Bowl / Bristlecone Twindle; Bottom Right:  Wooden Thai dipping bowl / Bristlecone Glindle

Materials

I have spindles with tips made from everything from lampwork glass, Swarovski crystals, stainless points, gemstone, and various types of wood!

Bowls are every bit as diverse.  I have bowls made from glass, ceramic, pottery, wood, and plastic.

20141125_111103Wooden Thai dipping bowl / Bristlecone Glindle

 Shape

Some spindles have a long tapered point and it doesn't much matter what shaped bowl you stand them in.  Others (like my Swarovski Crystal pointed spindles) have a short stubby point which basically means you need a shallow flat bowl or you have a hard time finding a place to balance within the bowl.  Other spindles, like my Tibetans and Malcolm Fielding Dervish have a larger circumference whorl than the skinny Russian style spindles, and therefore don’t fit comfortably in a high narrow bowl.

20141125_111922Grocery Store Ceramic dipping bowl / Texas Jeans Russian 

Speed/Friction

If you want a spindle to just fly ? you need to have as little friction as possible between the spindle tip and the surface it is spinning upon. (Oh my goodness a use for the university Phsics classes they made me take!)

20141125_111034

Pyrex finger bowl / Malcolm Fielding Dervish

A fine pointed wooden spindle has a satisfying zip on a really smooth surface like glass or ceramic.  Something like a well balanced metal tipped Russian on glass just flies!  Super fast spin is necessary for spinning very fine yarns (like gossamers and frog?’s hair that need so many twists per inch to hold together properly) but if one is wanting to spin fatter more lofty yarns with less twists per inch ? it may be desired to spin on a surface that slows the spin down.  You might try spinning a wooden tip in a wooden bowl.  The resulting spin is soft and a little bit dampened. 

Care should also be taken to avoid damage to both the tip surface and the bowl itself with repeated use.  A metal tip can bore a hole in a wooden bowl.  An abrasive bowl can wear away at the tip of a glass spindle.  Mismatched surfaces aren't good for either the spindle or the bowl.20141125_111154 Glazed Pottery Bowl / Bristlecone Twindle

Posture

Some people like to spin on basically a little platform with a small indentation in it.  This requires the "bowl" to sit at a specific angle, and usually for the spindle to remain upright throughout the spin, draft and wind processes.  I am lazy.  I like to sit cross-legged and slouch on the floor or lean back with both feet under me while sitting on the couch.  I find a medium sized, fairly wide, not too curved bottom bowl works best for my relaxed posture style.  I tried the "dent" style bowls and glass pendants and while they are beautiful, they just aren't for me. 20141125_112007 Grizzly Mountain Arts Spindle Bowl with Ceramic Insert / Bristlecone Unicorn Goddess

 

So what’s my favorite bowl?  Depends on the day but generally I like a bowl with medium characteristics all around - a middle of the road weight, maybe 2 inches deep, about 3 inches across made of some smooth surface that matches with the material tip of the spindle I am currently obsessed with Smile

27. February 2012 10:09
by Jobo
0 Comments

Silk and Satin… Angora

27. February 2012 10:09 by Jobo | 0 Comments

I've made a little more progress on my silk/satin angora project idea…

the Silk:
- Honey colored natural Tussah Silk – which I figured would match the satin angora perfectly… and it really really does!

the Satin:
- Beautiful naturally colored Satin Angora fiber from Twist of Fate Family Farm Bunny "Lady in Red"
- Nice long staples, smooth draws into lace, light beautiful halo.  Addictive.  I could spin this alllll day, every day.

Spun: 
- very fine laceweight, one ply of each delicacy, spun on light Zebisis Designs stone whorl spindles
- Small sample knit to do a swatch and test... 60 yards.  Seems to be just right for the pattern
- so far, spun half of the angora, did not weigh it though, so guessing.  I have approximately 300 yards of fine single... I might do some silk next so I can do some more knitting when the fancy strikes.
- The color of the silk and the angora are absolutely perfect for each other!

Pattern:  Frozen Leaves by Anusla
- as above, I wanted something that could be easily made larger or smaller depending on how much yardage I get.
- I really like the airyness of the swatch, and the light halo that is coming out.  I wanted the lace to be really light and open because I know the angora will be extremely warm.  I also decided to try adding beads, though I’m not sure I chose the right ones… I’ll have to ponder it longer before I add more in.  I can always break the two I put in and have them gone if I want.

The pretty:

frozen leaves swatch

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